Available Courses

The Penn Manor math Department offers a variety of courses in order to best meet the needs of each of our students and prepare them for college and life outside of the classroom. Below is a list and brief description of each of the mathematics courses offered at PMHS.

Career Prep Courses:

Transition Math

Pre-Algebra

Intro to Algebra A– This course is designed for ninth grade students who need to strengthen their mathematical skills and allows high school students to develop a solid mathematical foundation in Algebra 1. Students are provided with significant opportunities for practice and review throughout the course.Topics include real numbers and the language of Algebra, solving linear equations, and graphing relations and functions. Emphasis will be placed on applications. Students taking Introductory Algebra A must select Introductory Algebra B as a second semester freshman course and Introductory Algebra C as a fall sophomore course.

Intro to Algebra B– This course is designed for ninth grade students who need to strengthen their mathematical skills and allows high school students to develop a solid mathematical foundation in Algebra 1. Students are provided with opportunities for practice and review throughout the course. Topics include analyzing linear equations, solving linear inequalities, data analysis, and solving systems of equations and inequalities. Emphasis will be placed on applications.   Students taking Introductory B must select Introductory Algebra C as a fall sophomore course.

Intro to Algebra C– This course is designed for tenth grade students as the last semester of an Algebra I course.  Topics include polynomials, factoring, quadratics and keystone exam review.  Emphasis will be placed on applications.  Students who pass Introductory Algebra A, Introductory Algebra B, and Introductory Algebra C can then select an Algebra II course. Students will be required to take the Algebra I Keystone Exam at the conclusion of this course.

Algebra 2– This is the second course in the career prep sequence for students who have passed Introductory Algebra A, B, and C with average grades. This course applies algebra to topics such as functions, graphing techniques, quadratic equations, polynomials, exponents, and probability and statistics. Emphasis will be placed on applications. A graphing calculator would be helpful. Students who pass Algebra II and the Algebra Keystone exam will be recommended for Geometry. Students who pass Algebra II but do not pass the Keystone exam will be required to enroll in Keystone Algebra.

Geometry– This is the third course in the career prep sequence for students who have passed Algebra II with average grades. Topics from algebra will be reviewed, expanded and applied to study lines, polygons, circles, solids, and area. Emphasis is placed on application rather than on proof.

Algebra 3/Trigonometry– This is the fourth course in the career prep sequence and should be elected by students considering vocational schools. This course could also be chosen by students considering college programs, which do not require calculus, or by students who need to improve their math skills before taking CP Precalculus. This course emphasizes radical expressions, rational exponents, radical equations, complex numbers, applications of trigonometry, probability, statistics, and conic sections. A graphing calculator is recommended.

Remediation Courses:

Keystone Algebra 10– This is an elective course designed for sophomores who have completed either CP Algebra A/B or Introductory Algebra A/B/C and who would like additional preparation for the Algebra Keystone exam required for graduation.  The course will review content students are required to master to be successful on the Algebra Keystone exam. Students will be required to retake the Algebra I Keystone exam at the conclusion of this course.

Keystone Algebra 11– This is a course designed for juniors who have completed either CP Algebra A/B or Introductory Algebra A/B/C and still not successfully passed the Algebra Keystone exam required for graduation.   The course will review all content students are required to master to be successful on the Algebra Keystone exam. Students will be required to retake the Algebra I Keystone Exam at the conclusion of this course.

College Prep Courses:

CP Algebra 1A– This course is designed for students in the college prep sequence. CP Algebra IA includes operations with real numbers, linear equations, relations and functions, and linear inequalities.  Applications of algebraic topics are emphasized in this course.  A graphing calculator is strongly recommended. Students who completed CP Algebra IA in the fall AND CP Algebra IB in the spring will receive one math credit for Algebra I and an academic elective credit.

CP Algerba 1B– This course is designed for students in the college prep sequence.  CP Algebra IB includes systems of linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, factoring, quadratic functions and probability.  Applications of algebraic topics are emphasized in this course.  A graphing calculator is strongly recommended. Students who completed CP Algebra IA in the fall AND CP Algebra IB in the spring will receive one math credit for Algebra I and an academic elective credit. Students will be required to take the Algebra I Keystone Exam at the conclusion of this course.

CP Algebra 2– This is the second math course in the college prep sequence. It is recommended for all students considering a four-year college program. This course includes topics in linear equations and inequalities, functions and relations, polynomial and radical equations and inequalities, quadratic equations and probability and statistics. A graphing calculator is strongly recommended.

CP Geometry/Trigonometry– This course is the third math course for all students who are considering a four-year college program. This course should be completed before taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test. This course includes proof, lines, polygons, circles, solids, area, volume, numerical trigonometry, and topics from coordinate geometry.

CP Pre-Calculus– This is the fourth course in the college prep sequence. It is recommended for all students considering a four-year college program. This course extends the study of algebraic and trigonometry techniques necessary for calculus. A graphing calculator is strongly recommended.

CP Statistics– This course includes analyzing data, probability, distributions, variance, correlation, hypothesis testing, and inferences. It is recommended for any student who will need to take a Statistics course at the college level. Calculators will be used to analyze data throughout the course.  A graphing calculator is required.

SAT Prep– Students planning to take the SAT are encouraged to choose this elective to help them reach their full potential on this crucial test. Students will rotate through two nine-week courses. Each section focuses on preparing students for the verbal and math sections of the SAT. Students will be expected to maintain a “C” or better to receive credit for this course. Any student planning to take the SAT should be taking CP course work or higher and have taken at least CP Geometry prior to taking the SAT.

Honors and AP Courses:

Honors Algebra 2– This is the first course in the Honors/Advanced placement sequence. Topics include linear and quadratic equations, systems of equations, rational expressions and equations, and introduction to matrices. A graphing calculator is recommended.

Honors Geometry/Trigonometry– This course is the third math course for all students who are considering a four-year college program. This course should be completed before taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test. This course includes proof, lines, polygons, circles, solids, area, volume, numerical trigonometry, and topics from coordinate geometry.

Honors Math Analysis– This is the third course in the honors/advanced placement sequence. This course must be selected by any student planning to take A.P. Calculus. Topics include trigonometric functions, polynomial functions, and exponential functions, logarithmic functions, special functions, inequalities, transformations, conic sections, and limits. A graphing calculator is strongly recommended.

Honors Calculus– This is the fourth course in the honors/advanced placement sequence. This course is designed for students entering college programs which require calculus. It is especially designed for those entering engineering, math, science, business, or professional studies. It includes topics typically found in a first semester calculus course including limits, derivatives and integrals. A graphing calculator is strongly recommended. Students coming from CP Statistics will need teacher recommendation to take Honors Calculus.

AP Calculus AB– This year-long course should be taken by those who plan to take the advanced placement examination. Calculus AB is a course in single-variable calculus that includes limits and continuity, techniques and applications of the derivative, techniques and applications of the definite integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. It is equivalent to at least a semester of calculus at most colleges and universities, perhaps to a year of calculus at some. Algebraic, numerical, and graphical representations are emphasized throughout the course. Students who score high enough on the exam may be able to obtain up to four credits from some universities. A TI-89 graphing calculator is available for each student to use. Students who complete this class will earn two weighted credits. In order to earn AP weighted credit, students must take the Advanced Placement examination in May.

AP Calculus BC– This year-long course should be taken by those who plan to take the advanced placement examination. Calculus BC is a course in single-variable calculus that includes all the topics of Calculus AB plus additional topics in differential and integral calculus (including parametric, polar, and vector functions) and series. It is equivalent to at least a year of calculus at most colleges and universities. Algebraic, numerical, and graphical representations are emphasized throughout the course. Students who score high enough on the exam may be able to obtain up to eight credits from some universities. A TI-89 graphing calculator is available for each student to use. Students who complete this class will earn two weighted credits. In order to earn AP weighted credit, students must take the Advanced Placement examination in May.

AP Statistics

This year-long course should be taken by those who plan to take the advanced placement examination.A.P. Statistics is a course that introduces students to the major concepts of data analysis, specifically exploring and describing univariate and bivariate data graphically and numerically, experimental design, anticipating patterns through probability and simulation, and statistical inference procedures.The focal point of the course is drawing conclusions based on a variety of inference techniques.Students who score high enough on the exam may be able to obtain up to 4 credits for an introductory college statistics course at some universities.A TI-84 graphing calculator is available for each student to use.Students who complete this class will earn two weighted credits.In order to earn AP weighted credit, students must take the Advanced Placement examination in May. Students interested in taking AP Statistics must have earned at least a C in Honors Math Analysis OR an A in CP Statistics or an A in CP Precalculus with teacher recommendation.